NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF AEROSPACE

2014-13: High School Students Create Winning Design for NASA’s First Flight of Orion

2014-13: High School Students Create Winning Design for NASA’s First Flight of Orion

News release

 

National Institute of Aerospace (NIA)

100 Exploration Way

Hampton, VA 23666

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                      April 25, 2014

Harla Sherwood

National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, Va.

757-636-6300

harla.sherwood@nianet.org

 

NIA Release:  2014-13

 

High School Students Create Winning Design for NASA’s First Flight of Orion

edc

 

NASA’s Administrator, Charles Bolden (left), Marillyn Hewson, President/CEO of Lockheed Martin (right), and astronaut Rex Walheim (back) stand with Team ARES, from the Governors School for Science and Technology in Hampton, Va., winners of the Exploration Design Challenge high school competition.

Image Credit: NASA

 

After a year-long competition among high school teams across the country, evaluators from NASA, Lockheed Martin and the National Institute of Aerospace have selected Team ARES, from the Governor’s School for Science and Technology in Hampton, Va., as the winner of the high school portion of the Exploration Design Challenge (EDC).

The announcement Friday came during a ceremony held at the opening of the 2014 USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington. Team ARES was chosen from a group of five finalist teams announced in March.

 

The EDC was developed to engage students in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) by inviting them to help tackle one of the most significant dangers of human space flight — radiation exposure.

 

“This is a great day for Team ARES – you have done a remarkable job,” said NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, who helped announce the winning team. He continued, “I really want to congratulate all of our finalists. You are outstanding examples of the power of American innovation. Your passion for discovery and the creative ideas you have brought forward have made us think and have helped us take a fresh look at a very challenging problem on our path to Mars.”

 

Team ARES now will work with the NASA and Lockheed Martin spacecraft integration team to have the product of their experimental design approved for spaceflight. Once the equipment is approved, engineers will install it onto Orion’s crew module. Later this year, when Orion launches into orbit during Exploration Flight Test-1 (EFT-1), Lockheed Martin will host Team ARES at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida to watch their experiment launch into space.

 

During the EFT-1, Orion will fly through the Van Allen Belt, a dense radiation field that surrounds the Earth in a protective shell of electrically charged ions. Understanding and mitigating radiation exposure during Orion’s flight test can help scientists develop protective solutions before the first crewed mission. After EFT-1, the students will receive data indicating how well their design protected a dosimeter, an instrument used for measuring radiation exposure.

 

Speaking at the U.S.A Science and Engineering Festival, Lockheed Martin Chairman, President and CEO Marillyn Hewson said, “The Exploration Design Challenge has already reached 127,000 students worldwide – engaging them in real-world engineering challenges and igniting their imaginations about the endless possibilities of space discovery.”

 

Students around the world in grades K-12 still can be part of Orion’s first flight by completing an online radiation shielding activity. Students who complete the activity by June 30 will have their names flown as virtual crew members aboard Orion.

 

To learn more about the EDC and related activities, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education/edc

 

To learn more about NASA’s education programs, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/education

 

To learn more about Orion and the EFT-1 mission, visit:

http://lockheedmartin.com/orion

and

http://www.nasa.gov/orion

 

To learn more about the National Institute of Aerospace, visit:

 

nianet.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2014-12: The National Institute of Aerospace honored as a Best Nonprofits to Work For 2014 by The NonProfit Times

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                         April 17, 2014

Harla Sherwood

National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, Va.

757-636-6300

harla.sherwood@nianet.org

 

NIA Release:  2014-12

 

The National Institute of Aerospace honored as a Best Nonprofits to Work For 2014 by The NonProfit Times

 

Hampton, Va – On Tuesday, April 1, 2014 the NonProfit Times released its national list of the 2014 Best Nonprofits to Work For. The National Institute of Aerospace (NIA) placed 12th among all nonprofits in the United States and 5th among medium nonprofits (50-249 employees).

 

The Best Nonprofits to Work For program is one that is open to all nonprofits with 501(c)(3) status that have a facility with a minimum of 15 employees, in the United States. The assessment process was managed for The NonProfits Times by Best Companies Group (BCG) in Harrisburg, PA, an independent workplace research firm specializing in identifying and recognizing great places to work throughout the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom.  BCG utilized an 81-question survey to collect information about benefits, policies, practices and other information regarding the work environment, which comprised 25 percent of an organization’s overall evaluation. The other 75 percent of the evaluation was derived from a confidential 76-question employee Engagement & Satisfaction Survey.

 

“NIA likely ranked at the top, not only because we offer competitive pay and great benefits, but also due to the team-oriented and collaborative nature of our workforce,” said Cathy Hopkins, Director of Human Resources.  “We value the feedback received from the survey and continuously look for areas to improve upon to make NIA an even better and more rewarding place to work.”

 

“We are honored and proud to be recognized by The NonProfit Times as a 2014 Best Nonprofit to Work For,” said Dr. Douglas Stanley, President and Executive Director. “We consider our employees to be our greatest strength and make every effort to treat them with respect and to reward their efforts.  I am so very pleased that they value the culture of collaboration that we have created.”

To read more about the results of The NonProfitTimes Best Nonprofits to Work for results, please visit their website at: http://www.thenonprofittimes.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/BestNonprofits-20141.pdf

 

About the National Institute of Aerospace:

 

The National Institute of Aerospace (NIA) is a non-profit research and graduate education institute headquartered in Hampton, Virginia, near NASA’s Langley Research Center. NIA’s mission is to conduct leading-edge aerospace and atmospheric research, develop new technologies for the nation and help inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers.

 

NIA was formed in 2002 by a consortium of research universities to ensure a national capability to support NASA’s mission by expanding collaboration with academia and leveraging expertise inside and outside NASA. NIA performs research in a broad range of disciplines including space exploration, systems engineering, nanoscale materials science, flight systems, aerodynamics, air traffic management, aviation safety, planetary and space science, and global climate change. For more information, please visit, www.nianet.org.

 

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