NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF AEROSPACE

NIA News Release 2015-06: NIA Research Fellow Selected as AIAA Hampton Roads Section 2016 Engineer-of-the-Year

NIA News Release 2015-06: NIA Research Fellow Selected as AIAA Hampton Roads Section 2016 Engineer-of-the-Year

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE — October 8, 2015

Harla Sherwood
National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, Va.
harla.sherwood@nianet.org
757-636-6300

NIA Release: 2015-06

NIA Research Fellow Selected as AIAA Hampton Roads Section 2016 Engineer-of-the-Year

Dr. Ronald Krueger, Associate Research Fellow at the National Institute of Aerospace (NIA), has been selected as the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Hampton Roads Section 2016 Engineer-of-the-Year. Dr. Krueger is being recognized for his significant contributions to the analysis of composite delamination using finite element modeling as well as analysis benchmarking of computational tools, making him a recognized leader in his field.

Dr. Krueger is an internationally recognized expert in the field of analysis of delamination using finite element modeling (FEM).and computational fracture mechanics. He is leading research in the analysis of durability and damage tolerance of composites and failure of structures and components made of composites. Dr. Krueger also made numerous and significant technical contributions focusing on the problem of sandwich face sheet/core disbonding, which can develop into core fracture. He has organized meetings at NIA to bring together teams of professionals from industry, academia, and government to collaboratively address approaches for verifying, validating and benchmarking of analysis tools for the aerospace industry. Dr. Krueger supports NASA’s Advanced Composites Project (ACP) by organizing the Composites Computational Tools (CCT) working group and taking the lead. The group’s primary role is to identify and address numerical implementation issues of analysis codes used to perform progressive damage analysis (PDA) and transient dynamic analysis (TDA).

“We congratulate Ron on his selection as 2016 Engineer-of-the-Year for the AIAA Hampton Roads Section,” said Dr. Douglas Stanley, NIA President and Executive Director. “Dr. Krueger’s work has helped the advanced analysis methods to make a successful transition from the research to an application environment.”

Dr. Krueger will be recognized in the spring of 2016, when he will present the annual Axel T. Mattson Lecture, hosted by AIAA HRS. He will also be AIAA HRS’s nominee for Engineer of the Year for the Peninsula Engineers Council and the AIAA Region I Engineer of the Year.

For more information about the National Institute of Aerospace, visit: www.nianet.org.

For more information about AIAA, visit: www.aiaa.org.

News Release 2015-04: University Students Win NASA/NIA Space Engineering Design Contest

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE –June 19, 2015

Harla Sherwood
National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, Va.
757-636-6300
harla.sherwood@nianet.org

Kathy Barnstorff
Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.
757-864-9886/344-8511
Kathy.barnstorff@nasa.gov

Kathryn Hambleton
Headquarters, Washington
202-358-1100
kathryn.hambleton@nasa.gov

NIA Release: 2015-04

University Students Win NASA/NIA Space Engineering Design Contest

Future astronauts may someday explore Mars using winning concepts from NASA’s 2015 Revolutionary Aerospace Systems Concepts Academic Linkage (RASC-AL) Competition.

Sixteen teams competed in the contest sponsored by NASA and the National Institute of Aerospace (NIA), which challenges graduate and undergraduate students to solve real-life space exploration challenges. This year, the competition asked teams to develop a mission with innovative approaches and new technologies allowing astronauts to be less dependent on resources transported from Earth.

The teams presented their research and designs for full-scale mission plans before industry and NASA judges during a three-day forum June 14-17 in Cocoa Beach, Florida.

“Some of the teams had ideas that NASA might be able to use as we venture out beyond low-Earth orbit,” says Pat Troutman, Human Exploration Strategic Analysis lead at NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. “The judges and I were impressed by the students’ engineering skills and innovative thinking.”

The top overall honor went to students from the University of Maryland, College Park, who presented a space architecture using the moon as a fueling stop for Mars-bound spacecraft by creating fuel from lunar surface materials. The team also placed first in the undergraduate division.

Students from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida, claimed second place and University of Minnesota-Twin Cities, Minneapolis, placed third. Both of these schools presented entry, decent and landing concepts for a pathfinder mission to demonstrate placing a 20 metric ton payload on the surface of Mars. The student team from Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, placed first overall in the graduate division.

The two top overall finishers will present papers detailing their research at the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Space Conference in Pasadena, California, in September. NASA will provide a cash award to help offset travel expenses.

The teams developed their mission focused on one of four themes that could allow astronauts to be less dependent on resources transported from Earth: Earth independent Mars pioneering; Earth independent lunar pioneering; Mars moons prospector and large-scale Mars entry, descent and landing. Deep space missions like the journey to Mars will require humans to travel for long periods of time and to live and work independently from Earth, without the frequent resupply shipments. That means understanding the impact of utilizing resources both from the moon and Mars, and figuring out if their use is viable will be critically important to sustainable human exploration.

By participating in this design competition, which is sponsored by NASA’s Advanced Space Exploration Division (AES) at NASA Headquarters and the Space Mission Analysis Branch at NASA’s Langley Research Center, students receive real-world experience that parallels current NASA human space exploration mission design planning and may augment future NASA missions.

For a complete list of teams and more information about the RASC-AL competition, visit: http://www.nianet.org/RASCAL

For more information about NASA Langley, please go to: http://www.nasa.gov/langley

For more information about the National Institute of Aerospace, please visit: http://www.nianet.org

News Release 2015-02: New Langley Professor Named at National Institute of Aerospace

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – February 24, 2015

Harla Sherwood
National Institute of Aerospace, Hampton, Va.
harla.sherwood@nianet.org
757-636-6300

Kathy Barnstorff
Langley Research Center, Hampton, Va.
kathy.barnstorff@nasa.gov
757-864-9886/757-344-8511

Jason Maderer
Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Va.
jason.maderer@comm.gatech.edu
404-385-2966

NIA Release: 2015-02

New Langley Professor Named at National Institute of Aerospace

The National Institute of Aerospace (NIA) has a new Langley Distinguished Professor in Advanced Aerospace Systems Architecture for the Georgia Institute of Technology.

He is Dr. Dimitri Mavris, director of the Georgia Tech School of Aerospace Engineering’s Aerospace Systems Design Lab (ASDL). Mavris replaces his former colleague, Dr. Alan Wilhite, who retired after serving 10 years.

“It is a great honor – and an even greater opportunity – to assume the Langley Distinguished Professorship,” said Mavris, who also serves as Georgia Tech’s Boeing Professor for Advanced Aerospace Systems Analysis. “We are at a time in history when the potential for collaboration between NASA, the academic community and the private sector shows incredible promise. I look forward to moving that process along.”

The National Institute of Aerospace is a non-profit research and graduate institute, located near NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. It was created to support Langley’s mission to do cutting-edge aerospace and atmospheric research, develop new technologies and help train the next generation of scientists and engineers. NASA Langley also helps contribute to the funding for the Langley professorships.

“I am very excited that someone of Dr. Mavris’ stature and vision will be joining the NIA to perform transformational aerospace research,” said Dr. Douglas O. Stanley, president and executive director of the NIA. “I look forward to working closely with him as we create ASDL@NIA to lead the development of innovative aerospace concepts and design methods.”

Mavris will split his time between Atlanta and Hampton, where he will be the principal Georgia Tech faculty member resident at NIA. He will lead NIA’s research program in the field of systems analysis, with primary emphasis on developing life-cycle systems analysis and risk methodologies for advanced aerospace system architectures.

The professor earned his undergraduate, masters, and doctoral degrees in aerospace engineering from Georgia Tech. His research has focused on the formulation, development and implementation of comprehensive approaches to the design of affordable high-quality complex systems using visual analytics.

Under Mavris’ direction, the ASDL has served as a hub of multi-disciplinary system design and analysis work for a number of government and industry sponsors. Over the last 10 years, the lab has done $125 million worth of research in new methods and tools and employed more than 200 research faculty, masters, and doctoral students.

Mavris now joins five other Langley Professors, each of whom holds a teaching and research faculty appointment at one of six NIA founding member universities. They will work as an integrated team with the NIA and NASA Langley research community, and the NIA liaison professors at the six NIA founding universities.

Also joining the team will be Georgia Tech’s Dr. Brian German as the new Langley Associate Professor and Dr. Daniel P. Schrage returning as the Georgia Tech Liaison Professor.

NIA was formed by a consortium of universities and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Foundation. The roster of major research universities includes consortium members: Georgia Tech in Atlanta; Hampton University in Hampton; North Carolina A&T State University, Greensboro; North Carolina State University in Raleigh; University of Maryland, College Park; University of Virginia in Charlottesville; Virginia Tech in Blacksburg; and affiliate members Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Virginia, and the College of William & Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia.

For more information about the Georgia Institute of Technology, please visit: www.gatech.edu

For more information about NASA Langley, please go to: http://www.nasa.gov/langley

For more information about the National Institute of Aerospace, please visit: www.nianet.org

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